A Boston-based non-profit is proposing to build a 30,000-to-40,000-square-foot marijuana cultivation and processing facility — and create up to 50 new jobs — in CenTech Park for a proposed medical marijuana dispensary in Lynn.
Olde World Remedies, Inc.’s representatives will appear before the Board of Selectmen on Tuesday seeking a non-opposition letter, the required first step for the state to issue a license to operate a registered marijuana facility.
The company’s presentation, along with a Feb. 12 Special Town Meeting to approve zoning bylaws for recreational marijuana, will move forward despite the war of words between the federal government’s push to enforce federal marijuana laws and a vow by Massachusetts’ officials to defy the feds and follow the state’s legalization of marijuana.
Olde World says it already has a provisional certificate of registration of a registered marijuana dispensary in Lynn, but since this location does not suit a cultivation and processing facility, the organization will use the Grafton facility to fill the cultivation and processing needs for the Lynn facility. The group also plans to expand into Western Massachusetts.
Based on a business plan the company submitted to the state, the organization estimates the Lynn facility will be in the black by about $1.9 million by the fiscal year 2019.
If licensed by the state and approved by Grafton officials, Olde World, at 7 Millennium Drive, will be a neighbor to another soon-to-be-built 50,000-square-foot, $3 million medical marijuana facility, Nature’s Remedy, also on Millennium Drive, in CenTech Park. This area is zoned for office/light industrial and sits near the Shrewsbury border.
Olde World was formed in 2015 by President and CEO Alan Rothenberg. His organization says its goal is to provide consistent, high-quality medicine to registered, qualifying patients lab-tested medical grade cannabis products. These products include flower capsules, tinctures, topical balms and creams, waxes, vaporizing cartridges, and other oils, including “Rick Simpson’’ oils, a concentrated form of cannabis oil believed to have medical benefits, particularly for cancer.
The organization’s Grafton proposal states that it will only produce “medical-based edibles, nothing that is attractive to youth.’’
In its proposed “host agreement’’ with Grafton, the business also proposes to:

  • Pay Grafton $75,000 annually beginning 16 months after the state issues them a certificate of occupancy for its cultivation facility. That amount will increase by 3 percent each year for five years;
  • Pay real and property tax, as well as sales tax, if allowed by law. Real estate investment would lead to development and improvement within the community;
  • Cooperate with Grafton police by attending periodic meetings to review operational concerns, cooperate with investigations and notify police of any suspicious activity at the facility;
  • Issue a grant of up to $25,000 annually for drug awareness and abuse programs if the town experiences an increase in substance abuse;
  • Provide state-of-the-art security system consisting of perimeter, duress, panic and holdup alarms; interior and exterior surveillance cameras, ID badges and restrictions on limited-access areas;
  • Be committed to localized hiring, seeking to employ 35-50 qualified full-time employees.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *